“Crabs in a Bucket” by Joseph Vasquez

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Have you ever seen a bunch of crabs in a bucket? If you have, you’d notice that when one tries to climb out, the others will pull it back down. Instead of watching another escape, or better yet, working out a plan for all to escape, they would rather die than see one make it out.

I will never understand why a crab would do this. (I love crab legs, so keep them in the bucket and serve them with butter and lemon) Okay, back to the subject. A lot of people have the crab mindset. Thankfully we don’t live in a bucket, but why is it so hard to support one another? Why would we rather see someone suffering than succeeding?

My theory:  Other’s success exposes our excuses. I’m sure we’ve all heard and said one of the following:

The only reason she got promoted is that she dresses like that.

Of course you have it easier because you’re ___________

I would have made it too, but they don’t like me.

And many, many many.

There’s Injustice in the world, and it’s always going to be. Some people will have to work harder for the same opportunities as others, some people will have to overcome things most people would never imagine going through, but our individual journeys develop our character.

I, for one, am happy when I see other writers succeed because it means there are readers out there waiting to enjoy someone’s work. I love stories of people making it because it gives hope.

We need to stop pulling each other down. If we’re stuck in a bucket, let’s build a ladder that we can all use to get out. I want to sit on the beaches of the world, I want to wake up in Rome and have breakfast with my future wife whenever we feel like it, and I want to see others enjoy that same lifestyle.

 

I live in beautiful, sunny Southern California, the longest I’ve gone without a dog is two weeks, and I’m going to write until I can’t anymore.

“Quick Thoughts on Manhood” by Joseph Vasquez

Manhood is something that so many take for granted. A man was called to do something special with his life. We all have a battle to fight, a woman’s heart to win, and a story to pass on about both. Stand and fight with honor. Be a man that your wife will admire, raise your children so they will look up to you with love and admiration. Be the example that’s missing in the world, you are needed now more than ever. 

I live in beautiful, sunny Southern California, the longest I’ve gone without a dog is two weeks, and I’m going to write until I can’t anymore.

“Sticks and Stones” by Joseph Vasquez

Whoever said words don’t hurt obviously never wrote a book or a song. Some of the deepest scars are from words.

Some words are like weeds in an unattended garden, if you don’t constantly pull them, they will take over, once they take over, it’s almost impossible to grow anything else.

To this day I try to shake off words that have plagued me for years. I try to believe I’m better than what I’ve been told. I would be lying if I said I’m the type to feed off of negativity, sometimes it can be paralyzing and hard to recover from.

Say something nice to someone. Tearing them down will not build you up, and who knows what damages we are causing. How many suicides may have been prevented if we treated each other better? Depression, eating disorders and so many other conditions are often the product of verbal abuse.

When I was 18, I had dinner with a mentor, he told me that he believed I can do something special with my life. I didn’t know much about positive affirmations, and how they can shape our lives, but I’m grateful that someone taught me. 

Words can have an adverse effect on our mental health, but if we use our words wisely, who knows what good may come.

I live in beautiful, sunny Southern California, the longest I’ve gone without a dog is two weeks, and I’m going to write until I can’t anymore.

“Inside an Introverted Mind” by Joseph Vasquez

I’m not rude, I don’t think I’m any better than you, my mind just doesn’t function like yours. You may love to be around a lot of people, I don’t. It’s not that I don’t want to, I just can’t, I would love to go to a ball game, but I can’t be around that many people.

If I try to have a conversation with you, that means I care about you. If I try to make you laugh, it means I would take a bullet for you, and if I pursue a relationship with you, I have every intention of asking you to take my last name one day.

I admire how the extroverted mind works, in some ways, I’m envious. I’ve had to pretend that I had your traits during interviews; I mean, who really likes working on a team? I watch movies and wonder how people do that, if anything, I’d want to be the one writing the material for someone else.    

Introverts get stereotyped as weird, shy and as loners. Extroverts get stereotyped as loud, fake and needy. When will we realize that we are just people? Unique individuals with gifts that we can use to inspire and motivate each other.  

I live in beautiful, sunny Southern California, the longest I’ve gone without a dog is two weeks, and I’m going to write until I can’t anymore.

Am I a feminist? by Joseph Vasquez

NO! A feminist would have put an expletive in front of the no, it’s never right to talk like that in front of a lady.

What I am is a man that believes everyone should be treated equally as far as pay is concerned, and as far as opportunities go. I’m no feminist, I would never belittle a woman by telling her she’s as good as a man. I believe that a woman is meant to be treasured.

I believe women should be empowered to do anything, but men are not to treat them as equals.

The definition of a feminist may have good meanings, but it does more harm than good. Yes, a woman can do anything a man can do, but no, women were not meant to be treated like men.

Let’s look at the story of Adam and Eve, Adam was meant to watch over Eve, not the other way around. Adam was held responsible for taking care of Eve.

A woman deserves to have the door held for her, not because she’s weak, but because she’s respected.

I live in beautiful, sunny Southern California, the longest I’ve gone without a dog is two weeks, and I’m going to write until I can’t anymore.